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Historic Woodside House in Milton, North Carolina

Built in 1838, the gracious two-story Greek revival home is now open to guests with an appreciation for fine lodging. The five bedrooms, three full and five half-baths, as well as living areas are uniquely appointed with an eye for the dictates of taste in the style of the period. The Woodside House is perfect for a family reunion, romantic getaway, wedding, catered event, events small and large, indoors or on our spacious grounds. The home is also located very close to Virginia International Raceway, making it a great lodging option for families or groups attending the racetrack.

hand painted chest

Detail, hand painted chest

This beautifully decorated home is a historical treasure. The Entrance Hall pays homage to Thomas Day, a successful free black cabinetmaker and woodworker who operated a shop in Milton during the time of the home’s construction. Inside Woodside House there are many examples of Thomas Day’s famous woodworking. The spectacularly carved mahogany newel post and decorative stair rail in the entrance hall are pictured in books depicting his life and works. All of the beautiful fireplace mantles throughout the house were hand-carved by Thomas Day. Lastly, the inside panels of the front and side door were painted in his special style of “faux painting” which could make even plain wood appear as if it were mahogany.

Stephen Dodson Ramseur

Stephen Dodson Ramseur

Many rooms in the house bear the name of a branch of the distinguished family who built the Woodside, the Caleb Hazard Richmond family. General Stephen Dodson Ramseur was a distinguished Civil War hero (including at Gettysburg) and the nephew of Caleb Hazard and Mary Dodson Richmond. He stayed with them while recuperating from injuries received in the Battle of Malvern Hill. While there he fell in love with their daughter, Ellen, and they were married in the parlor. During their months of separation, the couple wrote many loving letters to each other. Ramseur earned a promotion to major general for leading an attack that saved the Confederate army at Spotsylvania Courthouse in May 1864. Months later, Ramseur was killed at the Battle of Cedar Creek. Three days before his death, their only daughter was born at Woodside. An historic marker stands at the front of the yard to honor Ramseur. Inside the house is the book about him titled Lee’s Gallant General. The parlor where the marriage took place is appropriately named the Ramseur Parlor where comfortable seating abounds, and the portraits of General and Mrs. Ramseur are highlighted in two recessed alcoves in remembrance of their tragic love story.

Thomas Day

Thomas Day practiced the art of cabinetmaking in Milton, a town in Caswell County near the Virginia border, during the first half of the nineteenth century. Day was born in Virginia and moved with his parents and brother to Warren County, North Carolina, in 1817. He is perhaps North Carolina’s most unique and well-known cabinetmaker. Thomas Day was a free African American who, through his skills and personal endeavors, became one of the most prolific producers of furniture in the state during the antebellum period.

Virginia International Raceway

Virginia International Raceway

Woodside House is located just 3 miles from VIR! It is the perfect place for fans or racers to lodge. With its capability of sleeping 12 people comfortably (and even 14 people with the use of two roll away beds) any group will be well-rested for a day at the races! Read more

The Cousins Reunion!! Great time! Perfect place!
– Marilyn Apirian, Semora Park, MD